Did We Put a Man on the Moon?

Week of April 1:

Activities:

  1. Moon Landing – proof for faking?
  2. Moon Landing Evidence Gallery Walk
  3. Jr. Skeptic reading
  4. Formulate an opinion & gather evidence
  5. Complete the Persuasive Writing graphic organizer

Week of March 25:

  1. Capitalism vs. Communism game
  2. Cold War powerpoint and discussion
  3. Space Race  reading
  4. Ancient Aliens – The NASA Connection

 

Intro to Media Literacy

3/20/2019

Do Now:

  1. Review Do the Math
  2. 1-2 paragraph response – choose one:
    1. News stations have abandoned their responsibility to inform people about the world. They should focus less on celebrity life and more on important world events.
    2. News stations should cover dramatic stories people want to hear about, like when movie stars have babies or athletes get arrested.  Their job is to give people what they want.

Activities:

  1. Discuss:  What IS the role of the media?  What, if any, responsibilities do those who create content have?
  2. The Role of Media
    1. Media as Agenda Setter, Gatekeeper, Watchdog
    2. Mass media, mainstream media and bias
    3. The Role of Media – Headlines activity
    4. Kahoot/Match activity

 

3/18/2019

Do Now: 

  1. Discuss – what is the purpose of the news media?
  2. Look at boston.com and talk about the types of articles & purpose.

Activities:

  • Today’s News: Information or Entertainment?
    1. Identify and list 5 key facts from the article. Highlight them as you read.
    2. Complete the “Do the Math”
    3. In pairs, discuss the Debate the Issue worksheet. Choose a side and help each other come up with supporting evidence. *You don’t both have to have the same opinion!
    4. Complete the Take a Stand response. Be sure to:
      1. Introduce your position with a topic sentence
      2. Give at least 2-3 pieces of supporting evidence
      3. Conclude your response with a call to action or something to get your reader thinking further about your topic.

3/14/2019

Do Now:

Read and discuss:

 

Why should you care about whether or not your news is real or fake? *

  1. You deserve the truth.  You are smart enough to make up your own mind – as long as you have the real facts in front of you.  You have every right to be insulted when you read fake news.
  2. Fake news can hurt you, and a lot of other people.  Purveyors of fake medical advice like Mercola.com and NaturalNews.com help perpetuate myths like HIV and AIDS aren’t related, or that vaccines cause autism.  These sites are heavily visited and their lies are dangerous.
  3. Real news can benefit you. If you are writing a research paper, your professor will expect you to vet your sources. If you are planning on voting in an election, you want to read as much good information on a candidate so you can vote for the person who best represents your ideas and beliefs.  Fake news will not help you get a good grade or make the world a better place, but real news can.

*from http://libguides.pace.edu/fakenews

Activities:

  1. Teams: Quiz: Can You Spot the Fake News Story?
  2. Today’s News: Information or Entertainment?
    1. Identify and list 5 key facts from the article.  Highlight them as you read.
    2. Complete the “Do the Math”
    3. In pairs, discuss the Debate the Issue worksheet.  Choose a side and help each other come up with supporting evidence.  *You don’t both have to have the same opinion!
    4. Complete the Take a Stand response.  Be sure to:
      1. Introduce your position with a topic sentence
      2. Give at least 2-3 pieces of supporting evidence
      3. Conclude your response with a call to action or something to get your reader thinking further about your topic.

3/13/2019

Do Now: Slate Advertising handout

Activities:

  1. Students Have ‘Dismaying’ Inability To Tell Fake News From Real, Study Finds
    1. What are some potential implications of an inability to tell fake news from real?
    2. What are some potential implications of an inability to tell advertising from news?

 


3/12/2019

 

QUICK!  Who is the Vice President of the United States?

Do Now:

  1. On the handout:
    1. Note your question #
    2. Answer the question thoughtfully in paragraph form

Activities:

  1. Get into groups according to handout color
    1. Each student is responsible for leading the group discussion for their question from the Do Now
      1. Where do you get your news? How do you hear about current events?
      2. How do you determine fake news from real news?
      3. Who “owns” the media?  In what ways can someone have ownership over the media?
      4. Do you trust the media to provide accurate, truthful and unbiased information?  Why or why not?
  1. Large group report-out
  2. Discuss Fukushima; look at the Fukushima handout.
    1. What do you see/what are your first reactions to this photo?
    2. What information do you look for to help determine if this is fact?

HW: None


Coming up:


  1. How to Detect Bias in the News
    1. Media contain ideological messages and have social and political implications
    2. What choices might writers, editors, producers and so on, make (consciously or unconsciously) that would lead to a biased view of the subject they’re covering?
    3. How can you detect bias in the media?  Review headlines at All Sides
    4. How might this bias play out in the media as agenda setter?  Gatekeeper?  Watchdog?
  2. Which way does your bias lean?
    1. https://www.politicalcompass.org/test
    2. Evaluating Media Bias
    3. How do your biases affect where you get your news – and what news you believe to be true?
    4. How does understanding our own bias help us to be more educated consumers of media?
      1. Polarization is destroying us.
  3. How do you know what information to trust?
    1. How Internet Conspiracy Theories Go Viral – And Get People To Believe Them, Too
    2. Review 10 Questions for Fake News Detection

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*Download the entire packet from here.

Welcome!

 

con·spir·a·cy the·o·ry

noun
 A belief that some covert but influential organization is responsible for a circumstance or event.
 Conspiracy theories rely on the view that the universe is governed by design, and embody three principles:
nothing happens by accident
nothing is as it seems
and everything is connected.

Goal:  Review syllabus; list known conspiracy theories; discuss truth.

Do Now:

On your index card:

  1. On one side, list any conspiracy theories you know of.
  2. On the other side, write what you think is a definition for the word truth.

Activities:

  1. Cover basic classroom things: review syllabus.
  2. Small group work:
    1. List 3-5 conspiracy theories you’d like to talk about this term.
    2. Come up with a group definition for truth.
  3. Brainstorm conspiracy theories on poster sheet.
  4. How do you define truth?  How do you know if something is true? Devise a class definition for truth and add it to the poster sheet.

Thurs May 10 – Thurs May 17

Guiding questions:

  1. What is media literacy & why is it important?
  2. What role do the media have in shaping society?
  3. How do your biases affect where you get your news – and what news you believe to be true?
  4. How does understanding our own bias help us to be more educated consumers of media?
  5. What is fake news, and how does it contribute to the spread of conspiracy theories?

Discussion starter:

  1. Where do you get your news? How do you hear about current events?
  2. How do you determine fake news from real news?
  3. Who “owns” the media?  In what ways can someone have ownership over the media?
  4. Do you trust the media to provide accurate, truthful and unbiased information?  Why or why not?

Activities:

  1. The Role of Media
    1. Media as Agenda Setter, Gatekeeper, Watchdog
    2. Mass media, mainstream media and bias
    3. The Role of Media – Headlines activity
    4. Kahoot/Match activity
  2. How to Detect Bias in the News
    1. Media contain ideological messages and have social and political implications
    2. What choices might writers, editors, producers and so on, make (consciously or unconsciously) that would lead to a biased view of the subject they’re covering?
    3. How can you detect bias in the media?  Review headlines at All Sides
    4. How might this bias play out in the media as agenda setter?  Gatekeeper?  Watchdog?
  3. Today’s News: Information or Entertainment?

 

Get ready – you’re starting your major project on Monday!
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*Download the entire packet from here.